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Jennifer Kouzi

Jennifer Kouzi avvo

jen-mJennifer Kouzi is licensed to practice law in New York (since January 2002) and Pennsylvania (since December 2012) and has focused her practice in the area of family law since 2004. Honored as a 2012 and 2013 Super Lawyers’ “Rising Star,” Jennifer takes pride in giving her clients the personal attention they deserve while going through what can be an emotional time. Jennifer handles pre- and post-nuptial agreements, uncontested and contested divorces, custody and support proceedings, post-judgment matters, trials and appeals. She is also a trained divorce mediator and has helped many couples separate and divorce amicably and with minimal expense by serving as a divorce mediator. Jennifer also frequently serves as an advisory attorney to parties who are engaged in divorce mediation with another mediator.

While each case has unique and interesting qualities, Jennifer has developed a particular interest in how the Internet impacts divorce and family law, including the use of e-mail, electronically stored financial information, chat rooms and social media websites such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. She counsels her clients very carefully with respect to how their online activities may affect their divorce or family law litigation.

Jennifer is a contributor to quarterlette.com and modernloss.com and enjoys writing about divorce and family law related issues affecting people today.

E: jennifer@kkallp.com
P: 212-921-5526

qlette-contributor

Maggie I. Kaminer

Maggie I. Kaminer avvo

Maggie Kaminer KKA LLPMaggie is admitted to the practice of law in New York, Maryland and Washington, D.C., and has practiced exclusively in New York in the areas of Matrimonial and Family Law. Maggie has appeared in both Supreme Court and Family Court in matters relating to divorce, custody, child support, visitation and equitable distribution, in all five boroughs, as well as Long Island. Maggie is experienced in both the negotiating and drafting of documents such as separation and custody agreements, as well as pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements. Maggie frequently attends Continuing Legal Education workshops and lectures focused on Matrimonial and Family Law. She is a member of the New York State Bar Association and New York County Lawyers Association.

NLJ’s 2016 Divorce, Trusts & Estates Trailblazers

E: maggie@kkallp.com
P: 212-921-5525

Divorce, courtesy Facebook. 5 Things You’ve Got to Know

Divorce, courtesy Facebook. 5 Things You’ve Got to Know

(From Maggie Kaminer) Faking Broke: “When it comes to financial evidence, it’s crazy what you can pick up from these sites,” says Maggie Kaminer, a matrimonial lawyer in New York City. She represented the mother of two children. The father had no money, no job. But then, lo and behold, he turned up on MySpace under another name—as the owner and promoter of a huge, popular night club in the Bronx. “It was awesome,” says Kaminer. “My client got a really good child support award.”


By Liz Brody, Yahoo News, July 25, 2010

Bijitha N. Varghese

Bijitha N. Varghese

Bijitha “Gigi” Varghese is admitted to the practice of law in New York and New Jersey. Gigi’s law career has been entirely devoted to the practice of divorce and family law. Gigi has appeared in both Supreme and Family Court in all five boroughs, as well as upstate New York, and in Superior Court throughout New Jersey. Gigi routinely handles matters involving pre-nuptial and post-nuptial agreements, separation agreements, spousal support, child custody, child support, parenting time, and equitable distribution. Gigi believes strongly that every client’s case is unique and requires a personalized plan specifically tailored to meet the wants and needs of each client.

E: gigi@kkallp.com
P: 212-921-5527

What are the residency requirements to file for divorce in New York?

What are the residency requirements to file
for divorce in New York?

In order to file an action for divorce, separation, or annulment in New York, residency requirements must be met in order for the court to hear your case. You must meet one of the following requirements: (1) you were married in New York and either you or your spouse is a resident of New York when the action is commenced, and one of you has been a resident for a continuous period of one year immediately preceding the commencement of the action; or (2) you and your spouse have resided in New York as husband and wife and either you or your spouse is a resident of the state when the action is commenced, and has been a resident for a continuous period of one year immediately preceding, or (3) the cause of action (grounds for the divorce, separation or annulment) occurred in the state and either party has been a resident of the state for a continuous period of at least one year immediately preceding the commencement of the action, or (4) the cause of action occurred in the state and both parties are residents of the state at the time of the commencement of the action, or (5) either party has been a resident of the state for a continuous period of at least two years immediately preceding the commencement of the action. (Domestic Relations Law Sections 230 and 231)

What are the grounds for divorce in New York?

What are the grounds for divorce in New York?

  1. The cruel and inhuman treatment of the plaintiff by the defendant such that the conduct of the defendant so endangers the physical or mental well being of the plaintiff as renders it unsafe or improper for the plaintiff to cohabit with the defendant.
  2. The abandonment of the plaintiff by the defendant for a period of one or more years.
  3. The confinement of the defendant in prison for a period of three or more consecutive years after the marriage of plaintiff and defendant.
  4. The commission of an act of adultery.
  5. The husband and wife have lived apart pursuant to a decree or judgment of separation for a period of one or more years after the granting of such decree or judgment, and satisfactory proof has been submitted by the plaintiff that he or she has substantially performed all the terms and conditions of such decree or judgment.
  6. The husband and wife have lived separate and apart pursuant to a written agreement of separation, subscribed by the parties thereto and acknowledged or proved in the form required to entitle a deed to be recorded, for a period of one or more years after the execution of such agreement and satisfactory proof has been submitted by the plaintiff that he or she has substantially performed all the terms and conditions of such agreement.
  7. Irretrievable breakdown in relationship for a period at least six months (commonly known as “no-fault divorce”).

When is a Prenuptial Agreement Appropriate?

When is a Prenuptial Agreement Appropriate?

Entering into a prenuptial agreement is a personal decision couples contemplating marriage must make. Generally speaking, a prenuptial agreement is indicated when one or both partners have children from a prior marriage, when parties desire to keep their finances separate, or when one or both partners are involved in family businesses. Many times people with a high net worth believe they need a prenuptial agreement to keep their pre-marital assets separate, although that is not always the case. A consultation with an attorney can help you decide if a prenuptial agreement is appropriate in your individual case.